Bridging Loan Calculator


Our bridging loan calculator gives a good indication on expected bridging loan rates and repayment costs when applying for a bridging loan. Apply to get the best bridging finance deal in the UK. BridgingLoans.co.uk is a Trading style of UK Property Finance.

Quick Loan Enquiry

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Please note, by completing this preliminary form, we WILL NOT perform credit checks, NOR will we pass your information to any third parties. We are committed to protecting your personal data and are registered with the Information Commissioner Office (ZA115985)

Please use our bridging loan calculator to get a rough idea of the total cost of a bridging loan.

In bridging finance, monthly payments are not normally required unless requested. Instead the borrower receives the net loan amount and on repayment of that loan also repays any interest generated whilst the loan was outstanding.

The maximum LTV value this calculator works to is 75%, if the calculated LTV is any higher you will need to contact the office to obtain your calculation.

At the time of writing every conceivable effort has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the data provided however the calculator should be used as a guide only and cannot be taken as a formal offer of a loan or in any other manner. For a full illustration please call 0116 4645544 or 0800 1691589 or email us info@bridgingloans.co.uk.

Understand Our Bridging Loan Rates


When considering a bridging loan (a short term loan, until a longer term solution is available), the key aspect is its viability and this mostly likely indicator if this would be the bridging loan rates. Bridging loan rates could be influenced by the Bank of England Base Rate and depending on circumstances can vary between 0.49% and 1.5% per month.

A bridging loan typically runs from 0 – 12 months and in certain circumstances, this can be extended longer.

Typical bridging loan criteria is as follows:

  • 0.49% – 1.5% monthly interest rate
  • 75% Loan to Value (LTV). This can increase to over 100% with additional security.
  • Arrangement fee of 1 – 2%
  • No exit fee (on certain products)
  • No minimum term i.e. loans can be repaid after a day

The table below resembles a typical loan repayment on £100, 000

Interest RateMonthly Interest
0.49%£580
0.70%£700
0.75%£750
0.85%£850
0.95%£950
1.00%£1,000
1.05%£1,050
1.10%£1,100
1.20%£1,200
1.25%£1,250
1.50%£1,500

What is a Bridging Loan?


Bridge loans are short-term property finance products that enable the borrower to complete one property transaction whilst waiting for another to finalise. A bridge loan can be secured against any suitable residential or commercial property, or some other real estate asset such as land.

Choosing The Right Bridging Loan


The bridging loan rate is the monthly or daily interest charged while the loan is outstanding i.e. before it is repaid. The rate can be determined by many factors such as whether the bridging loan is closed (guaranteed exit route for repayment of the loan) or open (less firm exit). Other aspects could be the size of the loan compared with the value of the property (this is known as Loan to Value or LTV), the type of security (residential property is currently a safer bet than commercial), whether the applicant has perfect credit etc.

A common use for bridging finance is when an ideal property is put on the market for sale but a client has yet to receive the money from the sale of their existing property. In this instance a closed bridging loan is when the existing property is on the market, sold and exchanged but has yet to complete. This will be looked at as a low risk for the lender as they will be confident of being repaid in the agreed time frame. If the existing property is yet to sell, this will be deemed as an open bridging loan. This type of bridging loan is viewed as a higher risk of guaranteed payment in the agreed time frame and as such may demand a higher interest rate from the lender.

Why Use A Bridging Loan Calculator?


The many recent press articles reporting upon the sustained and continual growth in the bridging finance market have been fully endorsed by bridgingloans.co.uk. Inquiry levels have increased at almost daily and unprecedented levels however the spike in volumes can create problems for traditional brokerages who have not strategized for this and customers changing data collecting preferences and who are unable to cope with the increased flow in what is now deemed as the new norm in the bridging and development finance market.

At bridgingloans.co.uk, we have found that many of our customers who are looking at bridging finance in the initial stages do not want physical or verbal contact but simply want all the information and data at hand so they can understand the workings and costs of bridging finance in their own time and often without the need or wish to involve an advisor. Bridging Finance is a niche but not overly complicated form of lending and much less common and far less understood than more traditional types of finance such as mortgage finance.

Customers thinking that they potentially may need a bridging loan and who are unaware of how a bridging loan works now more often than not prefer to browse a simple and straight forward site such as that available at www.bridgingloans.co.uk and be able to have numerous attempts at our specially created calculator which allows full access to multiple different financial applications. In this scenario, once a client finds a situation that fits their budget and that visually shows an accurate picture on all affordability issues, if they then wish, they can call and discuss their bridging finance requirements in more detail with a fully qualified advisor to ensure that in practice this is a product they can afford and is suitable for their needs.

The site itself and its fully automated and accurate calculator is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week enabling this requirement to be met and experienced staff at bridgingloans.co.uk can be contacted by email or telephone from 9 – 9 daily. The simplicity and accuracy of the bridgingloans.co.uk calculator has given rise to numerous positive reviews and a large section of those using the calculator and who call our office to discuss their needs benefit from being in a much more informed state and with a far greater understanding of how bridging finance works.

Bridging Loan Partners


Our bridging loan partners help us deliver the best property bridging loans for our customers allowing UK Property Finance to provide the best bridging loan rates in the UK.

Bridging Loan Lenders

Bridging Finance does not fit every budget and every scenario but the site and calculator allows easy access for the customer to establish this during the initial fact finding operation and the extended availability of the staff allows advice and recommendations to be given by fully trained, qualified and experienced individuals at bridgingloans.co.uk and allows any prospective borrower to make an informed choice on what is and is not right for them.

Frequently Asked Questions


What is the interest rate on a bridge loan?

Bridging loans differ from most other borrowing products in that the interest rate is nearly always charged on a monthly basis as opposed to annually. Although the standard interest on these products is typically set between 1% and 1.5% per month, better (and worse) deals are available depending on your provider. For this reason, it always pays to do a little research beforehand or to use the services of an FCA regulated broker who will get you the best deal available based on your individual borrowing requirements and personal circumstances.

What is the meaning of bridge finance?

Bridging finance is a short-term borrowing product that is quick to arrange and easily securable against any property type. Whereas most remortgaging products and second charge loans take weeks or months to organise, bridging finance can be approved within a matter of hours – with the funds being released in just five to seven days. Traditionally used to bridge the gap between one property transaction and the next, bridging loans can now be used for any purpose the borrower sees fit. Common uses for this type of borrowing product include the funding of swift property purchases, the payment of urgent tax bills and the financing of new build property developments, renovation work and refurbishments.

What is bridge capital?

Bridging capital is money raised against property assets that is usually provided in order to solve a short-term cash flow crisis. Whether you are a property developer in need of urgent finance in order to complete a new build or refurbishment project, or a business owner in search of a much needed financial injection that will solve a cash-flow crisis, bridging finance is a readily available source of income that offers competitive borrowing rates and a swift injection of funds.

What is a bridge loan for real estate?

A bridge loan for real estate is a useful borrowing product that can be used for any type of property financing transaction imaginable. Whether you need a short-term, secured borrowing product in order to purchase a property at auction, or you are looking for a reliable source of finance that will enable you to acquire a new place of residence whilst awaiting the outcome of the sale of your existing home, a bridge loan for real estate can help.

What is auction finance?

If you are buying property at auction and you have insufficient funds available to secure the deal then a bridging loan for auction finance can solve all of your immediate cash flow problems at once. With quickly released funds available for periods from 1 to 24 months, bridging loans are the perfect solution for anyone who needs to move quickly in order to cover the costs of buying an auction property before any rival competitor makes a successful bid that upstages them.

What is an end financing loan?

Unlike a bridge loan, which is a short-term borrowing product that is designed to solve a temporary cash flow problem, an end financing loan serves as a long-term form of credit. End financing is typically used to settle a short-term debt and these particular loans are normally used as an exit strategy for their short-term counterparts. However, unlike most other types of finance, end finance is seldom provided as an interest free type of borrowing product – meaning the interest on funds borrowed plus the actual capital itself are repayable at the end of the loan term.

What is a swing loan?

In essence, a swing loan is exactly the same thing as a bridging loan. Just as a short-term bridge loan can help solve all manner of intermediary property purchasing problems, so too can swing finance. However, a swing loan is slightly different from a normal bridging loan in so far as the funds borrowed are usually secured against the equity in the property you currently own and the collateral tied in with the property you are about to purchase.

Glossary


If you are looking to apply for bridging finance, or some other secured borrowing product, yet you have insufficient equity in your home or some other property you are using as collateral then you will need to provide additional security in the form of some other property asset(s) that you own or have mortgaged. Additional security is always required when you need to borrow a large sum of money that exceeds the LTV rate offered by your provider.
A charge is what gives the lender the right to sell your property should you default on a credit agreement and find yourself unable to reach a suitable repayment program with your finance provider. If you have acquired a property by means of a mortgage, then your mortgage provider will typically have the first charge over your home. Any additional secured products taken out against your home or some other property that you own, will often be referred to as a second or third- charge borrowing product.
Closed bridging loans are short-term borrowing products that are designed for borrowers with a clear exit strategy. If you only require finance for a short period of time, and you are simply waiting for funds to be released in order to repay the loan whilst being 100% certain that those funds will become available to you then you will typically require closed bridging finance to solve your cash flow problems.
With bridging loans, the actual amount of interest you are expected to repay is typically calculated on a daily basis, once the first month has elapsed. The advantage of this, is that if the borrower repays the loan amount early, the amount of interest repayable will only by for X amount of days, as opposed to a full month worth of interest.
Whereas a mortgage or secured loan will usually require monthly repayments, a bridging loan does not. Instead, the lender expects the borrower to have a viable exit strategy whereby the entire loan amount, plus any accrued interest and additional fees, are rolled up and paid can be paid at once - usually by an agreed date. This is known an exit route and common examples include refinancing a property or property sale.

The FCA, or Financial Conduct Authority, is an independent body that has been put into place in order to protect consumers from irresponsible lenders. If a borrower required bridging finance secured against a property they live in, or a property inhabited by a family member, then the an FCA regulated product is usually required.

The FCA is always concerned that:

* Consumers get a fair deal and are made aware of the best available options in terms of their own interests.

and that;

* Lenders regulated by them should always strive to operate with integrity and responsibility.

It is important to realize that not all firms operate under the guidelines set down by the FCA - so, you should always exercise due diligence and do a little research before dealing with a new finance provider.

As mentioned earlier, bridging loans are not paid back in regular installments. Instead, finance is provided for a fixed period of time and the interest generated is added to the total repayable amount in monthly increments.

The Loan to Value, or LTV amount, is an actual percentage of the property value used as equity when taking out a secured borrowing product.

For example, if you own a property outright and that property is worth £200,000, and you are looking for a loan with a net worth of £50,000, then that loan product will have an LTV of 25%. Most bridging loan providers will consider LTVs of up to 80% of the equity tied up in a property used as collateral. However, LTVs of up to 100% are possible, provided a borrower can offer additional security in the form of extra property assets.

When bridging lenders talk about the Net Bridging Loan, they are speaking specifically about the net worth of the loan, before any additional costs or arrangement fees are added.

For example, if a client is looking to borrow £100,000, and the lender's fee, assessment charges and 12 month interest costs increase the outstanding balance of the loan to £110,000, the Net Bridging Loan amount is still £100,000.

If a borrower cannot provide a guaranteed exit route, then the type of finance offered is referred to as an open bridging loan. This type of finance is useful when a property owner needs to raise funds in order to finance the purchase of a new home before a buyer is found who is interested in the applicant's original property.

If you are looking to secure finance against a mortgaged property and you already have an excellent deal on that mortgage, or you have a mortgage that has large exit fee penalties that you would do better to avoid, then a second or additional charge bridging loan will typically be in your best interests.

2nd charge bridging loans automatically rank lower down in the chain in comparison to 1st charge loans, which effectively means that if the property is repossessed in any set of circumstances, the proceeds from the sale will primarily be allocated towards settling the debt owed to the original lender.

Once the first lender has been recompensed, the second charge lender will be compensated, and so on. If you are applying for a second charge borrowing product, permission will always be required from the 1st charge provider.

When you apply for a bridging loan, or any other secured borrowing product, you will need to provide some kind of insurance that the lender will get their money back should you default on repayments. This is known as security - and it could be the equity tied up in a residential property or the collateral held in some commercial real estate that you own.
In essence, the term of a loan is nothing more than the expected repayment period or loan duration. If you need to borrow secured funds for a 12 month term, then the loan can be repaid any time before those 12 months have elapsed - and typically without penalty. In this situation, the interest will only be repayable for the length of time that the money has been borrowed and not the full year.
An asset is something that you own that can also be used for security when applying for finance. Examples of assets include items of machinery, vehicles, building materials, antique furniture and even brand names. Basically, anything of monetary value that can be sold should you default on the repayment of your loan.
Similar to bridging finance, development finance is a short term loan type that is available between one and three years. Development finance is specifically intended to assist with the funding of property development projects and it differs from other types of finance in that the funds are usually made available in stages of completion. This is possible because property development projects always increase in value as the project itself progresses from one stage to the next. Therefore, the lender can release more and more funds, safe in the knowledge that their investment is protected should the borrower default.

Last Updated: Mar 24, 2017 @ 3:47 pm
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Disclaimer

The advice and processing on all financial products introduced via this website will be handled by UK Property Finance Ltd, which is authorised by The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) no 667602. The FCA do not regulate all mortgages such as Buy to Let and Commercial. Think Carefully before securing debts against your home. Your property could be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage or any other debt secured on it.

Association of Bridging Professionals
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