Bridging Loan Types


The bridging loan rate is the monthly or daily interest charged while the loan is outstanding i.e. before it is repaid. The rate can be determined by many factors such as whether the bridging loan is closed (guaranteed exit route for repayment of the loan) or open (less firm exit). Other aspects could be the size of the loan compared with the value of the property (this is known as Loan to Value or LTV), the type of security (residential property is currently a safer bet than commercial), whether the applicant has perfect credit, etc.

A common use for bridging finance is when an ideal property is put on the market for sale, but a client has yet to receive the money from the sale of their existing property. In this instance, a closed bridging loan is when the current property is on the market, sold and exchanged but has yet to complete. This loan will be looked at as a low risk for the lender as they will be confident of being repaid in the agreed time frame. If the existing property is yet to sell, this will be deemed as an open bridging loan. This bridging loan is viewed as a higher risk of guaranteed payment in the agreed time frame and as such may demand a higher interest rate from the lender.

Bridging Loans Available Through Us

Our criteria on bridging loans depends on which fund or lender we use. This means it is not possible to give accurate bridging loan rates and costs without speaking with you directly, however we can give you a guideline that will help you understand what is available within the market.

We offer the following bridging loan types:

2 Nursery Court, Unit 2C, Kibworth Business Park, Harborough Road, Kibworth Harcourt, Leicestershire, LE8 0EX

The advice and processing on all financial products introduced via this website will be handled by UK Property Finance Ltd, which is authorised by The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) no 667602. The FCA do not regulate all mortgages such as Buy to Let and Commercial. Think Carefully before securing debts against your home. Your property could be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage or any other debt secured on it.

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